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“We are standing up for fair pay and benefits for our families” Standing up for fair pay, benefits and job protections for over 3,600 workers in 6 locations across the U.S. “UAW members get up every day and put in long, hard hours of work from designing to building Mack trucks,” said Ray Curry, Secretary-Treasurer of the UAW and Director of the Heavy Truck Department. “UAW members carry on their shoulders the profits of Mack and they are simply asking for dignity, fair pay and job protections.”

The United Auto Workers International Executive Board voted in a motion Saturday morning to authorize increased strike pay to $275 per week for all UAW members on strike and allow members striking

Dear Union Brothers and Sisters: A short time ago, today, Friday, October 11, 2019, we counterproposed to the Company's last offer which included all of your outstanding proposals that are all at the main table and unsettled. With this latest comprehensive proposal, if GM accepts and agrees to this group of proposals, we will have a Tentative Agreement.

Republicans talk a good game. In fact, Sen. Debbie Stabenow said that she thought President Trump might have borrowed her speeches on the campaign trail in 2016 as he wooed workers who wanted something different out of Washington.

“You know what the problem is? You have to do more than talk or have symbols,” Stabenow told delegates at the 2018 UAW Community Action Program (CAP) Conference on Wednesday. “You have to act.”

For instance, she said, Trump promised that on Day 1 of his administration, he would address currency manipulation.

Photo by Jessie Jesson, UAW Local 686

At present, the stock market is doing well and has been since former President Barack Obama’s economic policies -- including the rescue of the domestic auto industry -- brought our nation back from the Great Recession.

“But what good is that if Americans remain in low-wage jobs, can only work part-time or do not have the benefits they need for their families?” Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts asked delegates at the 2018 UAW Community Action Program (CAP) Conference on Wednesday.

Photo by Jessie Jesson, UAW Local 686

About 500 UAW CAP Conference men and women gathered on Wednesday for a breakfast meeting that celebrated women and reminded everyone why this is a pivotal time. 2018 UAW Community Action Program (CAP) Conference on Wednesday.

UAW Vice President Cindy Estrada, the mother of two 14-year-old twins, explained that with the turmoil on Capitol Hill, we must not allow crisis to diminish hope.

“Our democracy, the rule of law and institutions that we depend on are under attack. Your vigilance and passion are the most important tools we have to fight back — every single one of you here today,” said U.S. Congresswoman Norma J. Torres, who represents California's 35th Congressional District, speaking before CAP Conference delegates Monday morning.

Reconnecting with voters, rebuilding the infrastructure to elect labor friendly candidates, and concentrating on state and local offices are just some of the ways to fight back against the corporate control of our government, according to panelists at the 2018 UAW Community Action Program (CAP) Conference.

When Republicans took complete control of the government in 2016, most union members understood that workers would take a hit, but we underestimated just how bad it would be, the UAW’s chief lobbyist told political activists Monday.

From attacks on health care, workers’ rights and immigrants to inaction on NAFTA, a lot of awful things are happening in Washington right now, Josh Nassar, the UAW’s legislative director, told delegates at the 2018 UAW Community Action Program (CAP) Conference.

“Today’s General Motors profit sharing, established under the 2015 contract negotiations, recognizes that UAW GM members’ hard work is an essential part of General Motors sales and profits. UAW members at GM negotiated a well-deserved share in the profits of their hard work and sacrifice.”

“I grew up knowing that if you went to an auto plant you would instantly be in the middle class, because the UAW fought for workers to earn wages that would help them support their families, send their children to college and make a difference in their communities,” Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence told CAP delegates.

In an impassioned speech, Lawrence recalled past decades when organized labor paved the way for laws and programs that helped to create economic and social justice for America’s families.